BACK STORY TO THE PUPPET WITHOUT SHOES

…the American students asked
What were their homes like?
Did you have people with guns to protect you?
What were the children’s names?
What did you eat?
Where did you stay?
How many puppets do you have?
YES, JESUS LOOOOOOO-UH-UHVS MEEEEE!
Do puppets come with tongues that move and that are not always glued down?
Did you really see children without shoes?
I overheard two students talking about one of my puppets, who the Haitian children had named Danville. They were whispering about Danville not having any shoes on compared to my other puppets with shoes. I explained that in one of the villages where I served “the bare footed children were fascinated that my Danville had shoes and they did’t. I took off the puppet’s shoes before I visited the next village, where I become blatantly aware that not only did my puppet have shoes but it was dressed better than the children surrounding me.” The classroom became very quiet. The look on the American students’ faces was the same feeling I felt in my heart 14 years ago on my first journey to the beautiful country of Haiti.
a little girl walks proudly in her village
(a little barefooted Haitian girl
walks proudly through her village)


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